Tag Archives: Dangerbird

New Sebadoh video: Stunned

Video: Sebadoh -- “Stunned”

From Act Surprised, out May 24 on Dangerbird.

Here’s the second single from the new Sebadoh album. The first was a classic Lou slow burner, and this one is a scuzzy Jake jam.

Loewenstein told Fader, “The incessant bombardment of the senses with media and advertising can lead to a kind of self defensive paralysis. I am completely stunned at this point.”

You can feel that.

Sebadoh: web, twitter, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

New Sebadoh video: Celebrate the Void

Video: Sebadoh -- “Celebrate the Void”

Sebadoh - celebrate the void

From Act Surprised, out May 24 on Dangerbird.

Lou Barlow has teamed back up with Jason Loewenstein and recorded a new Sebadoh album with Bob D’Amico on drums.

Barlow says, “The first line of this song: ‘I get the feeling you don’t feel me’ is pretty good. It could be a line in an Ariana Grande song, I like it. I followed it from there through some general complaints about a composite character in my life, someone I could never crack. Sometimes the walls are too high. If you think about it, the resistance was always there, even in the very beginning. What to do? Pick endlessly at the seams? Replay moments in my head looking for a way to explain it all? No, stop, there is no one answer and that’s OK…Celebrate the void.”

Lou recently posted a funny (and kinda bitchy) story on his Instagram about his original Sebadoh partner:

“Eric Gaffney, then a full fledged member of the band (receiving equal 1/3rd of all (inc. merch) proceeds according t band constitutional decree) made his -own- band t-shirt and sold them discreetly at each show, keeping all profits t himself etc. a brazen move that only a genius such as himself could pull off.. of course we knew what was happening and didn’t say much.. shortly afterwards he demanded 1/3rd of all recording advances t record his own material and -not- tour with th band (ala Brian Wilson) that didn’t go down as well.. to his credit we were never quite th same band after he left, we reached some wonderful peaks of chaos and beauty w him behind th drums and on guitar..”

Good times.

Sebadoh: web, twitter, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Sebadoh video: Celebrate the Void

New Matt Costa video: I Remember It Well #2

Video: Matt Costa -- “I Remember It Well #2”

Matt Costa - I Remember It Well #2

Directed by Pamela Littky. From Santa Rosa Fangs, out now on Dangerbird.

I like Matt Costa. His 2006 album, Songs We Sing, has been in heavy rotation in the family car since my son was a toddler. The song “Sunshine” taught my little guy about harmonizing, or at least that was the first time he noticed how cool it sounds when “another person starts singing like that.”

Before I had a kid I imagined how I would subconsciously shape him into being a cool person by exposing him exclusively to an approved playlist of important music. By the time he was three he would be familiar with Elvis Presley’s Sun sessions and the complete discography of the Beatles. I had it all mapped out.

Well, a funny thing happens when you have a kid: they develop their own personality complete with their own taste. I hadn’t seen that coming. Combine that with exposure to “unapproved” music via babysitters and all of a sudden you’ve got a toddler turning his uptight dad on to the joys of Lady Gaga and Taio Cruz. There’s nothing funnier (to a nanny) than teaching a tiny little boy all the words to “Party in the USA.”

And somewhere around that same time period we discovered Matt Costa’s Songs We Sing. A lot of what Costa has done since then has more of a power pop feel, but this new song is a return to the pretty, acoustic, finger-picked sound that I like best. My kid is 11 now and has very little interest in any of the music (or anything else) that I think is cool, but I’m going to play this for him to see what he thinks.

Matt Costa: web, twitter, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Matt Costa video: I Remember It Well #2

Joy Zipper – American Whip

Joy ZipperAmerican Whip (Dangerbird)

Being derivative isn’t an immediate indication of failure, nor is it always advantageous to forge new waters. Sometimes, when discovering a new band, it helps when what you’re hearing is distinctly familiar. Something might remind you of other bands you’ve listened to and memories involving those bands—sounds trigger responses in the brain and the senses become flooded with fragments of past experiences.

Joy Zipper sounds a lot like a lot of bands—their spacey pop atmospherics recall the typical checklist of Wilson-ian influences. American Whip remains interesting throughout, however, because Joy Zipper doesn’t settle for falling into comfortable grooves—chirpy instrumentation, ooo’s and aaah’s—instead they melt their pop sensibilities with the same wall-of-sound production and loving drool of My Bloody Valentine and Air.

American Whip unfurls, revealing vines of interweaving beauty and cutesy-wutesy sentiments (“I love you more than a thousand Christmases”) like the Canadian group Stars on Nyquil PM. It’s an impressive albeit inconsistent album that suffers from its timing—in the so-called renaissance of classic pop music, Joy Zipper just doesn’t do enough to separate American Whip from the crowd.

In 2004, lots of bands did pop well—but in a year that saw the master of the genre, Brian Wilson, return to show us how it’s done, it’s just too hard to take anything else seriously. Teenage symphony to God, this ain’t.