Tag Archives: Depeche Mode

Forever Summer

Forever Summer by The Silence

I’ve been in bands my entire adult life. For most of that time, it was the most important element of my identity. Being in a band was not only a crucial creative outlet, but also a social space; it was how I met people beyond what is now the GLONO crew.

The first band I had--or at least the first group of guys who tried to get a functioning, performing band together--was The Silence. We were really only together for a summer, but we played a couple of shows, if you count basements as venues, and wrote and recorded eight songs. The best of these songs was a perfect little piece of electro pop called “Forever Summer,” written by Rick Grossenbacher.

The Silence, from top going right: Dan Terpstra, Mike DeRuiter, Derek Phillips (Author), Rick Grossenbacher

Rick was our keyboardist and sequencer. He loved electronic dance music way before there was anything called EDM. His flavor was more in the vein of Camoflage, Front 242, New Order and Depeche Mode. Man, he loved Depeche Mode. He and Dan, our lead guitarist, would go on and on quoting videos, interviews and studio banter I can only assume came from outtakes and bootlegs.

“Start the tape, Mart.”

At least I think that quote is from Depeche Mode. I don’t really know because that wasn’t my scene. I came from the Brit Pop school and was specifically focused on the Madchester sound of The Stone Roses. Happy Mondays and The Charlatans. The most important Manchester influence for me though was Johnny Marr and he was then in his dance band project, Electronic, with New Order’s Bernard Sumner. So if keyboards, drum machines and sequencers were good enough for Johnny, they were good enough for me.

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Lonely at Lollapalooza 2009

Lollapalooza 2009Lollapalooza 2009

Grant Park, Chicago, August 7-9, 2009

This was my first trip back to Chicago since moving to Portland, Oregon in December 2008. As much as I love Portland, there is a large piece of my heart in that city by the lake. It’s where I was born, it’s where I formed my favorite band, and it’s where my son was born. It’s still my city.

So it was with great excitement and anticipation that I returned to see friends, drink a lot of beer and catch some live rock and fucking roll. I’d been planning and thinking of this trip since before we even moved so you’d think I’d have had all the details ironed out like the Arctic Monkeys‘ fitted shirts. You don’t know me well and the Monkeys no longer wear Fred Perry, but more on that later…

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Sales: 80,000 People Still Like Depeche Mode

BillboardBah. The Top Ten of the Billboard 200 is once again filled with a bunch of crap nobody cares about. Come on! Won’t somebody come along excite the world again? Is Taylor Swift as close as we’re going to get to that in 2009?

1. Rick Ross – “Deeper Than Rap” – 158,000 (debut)

2. “Hannah Montana: the Movie” soundtrack – 104,000 (down 22%)

3. Depeche Mode – “Sounds of the Universe” – 80,000 (debut)

4. Rascal Flatts – “Unstoppable” – 68,000 (down 37%)

5. Asher Roth – “Asleep in the Bread Aisle” – 65,000 (debut)

6. “Twilight” soundtrack – 40,000 (down 19%)

7. Lady GaGa – “The Fame” – 40,000 (up 9%)

8. Day26 – “Forever in a Day” – 37,000 (down 67%)

9. “Now 30” compilation – 36,000 (down 19%)

10. Jadakiss – “The Last Kiss” – 30,000 (down 32%)

Seems a shame that Depeche Mode sold almost six times as many records as the Pet Shop Boys, whose new album, Yes debuted at #32 with 14,000.

Additional sales data via MTV.

Lollapalooza Parties Like It's 1992

I Love the 80sThe Chicago Tribune‘s Greg Kot got the scoop on the 2009 Lollapalooza headliners:

Depeche Mode, the Beastie Boys and a reunited Jane’s Addiction are expected to headline the fifth annual Lollapalooza Aug. 7-9 in Grant Park.

Though promoters would not confirm the information Friday, multiple sources inside the industry said the three headliners are a lock for the festival. Three more arena-level headliners are expected to be included when the complete lineup is announced next month.

Excited? Or were you hoping for something more…um…timely? I haven’t seen Jane’s Addiction since the first Lollapalooza in 1991. But then again, I’m old and crotchedly.

Ten "Fiercest" British Frontmen Revealed

Jake has long bemoaned the fact that British singers all sound like pansies. [Specifically, English singers -ed.] It’s his main argument for abandoning a genre that once fueled his music collection and has led to hilarious arguments at countless bars with me and Loftus. But is the Old Man right?

MuchMusic has a list of the The 10 Fiercest British Frontmen Of The Past Decade and I gotta say, there’s a fair amount of dandy-ism on display and maybe only one dude I definitely wouldn’t fight in an alley (Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher, who I am sure would fight dirty to protect his hair).

Seven sissies I could stomp and three dudes I would not fight after the jump.

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Coachella 2006

Yeah Yeah YeahsI was somewhere around Indio, in the apex of the desert, when Tommy Lee kicked in. As I walked through the manicured grass, happily eating corn on the cob, the thin and dust-caked Motley Crue drummer ran up to me, weaving his arms and torso in a spastic model of the Axl Rose snake dance. I continued gnawing on the corn, and flicked my eyes upward in annoyance. He chuckled and regrouped with his bleached-blonde entourage to continue down the field, toward the throbbing bass of Daft Punk.

Even without the icky hair-metal run-ins, this year’s Coachella Festival still would have been the strangest one yet. The cultural oasis of the Colorado Desert (held May 29-30) featured a predictably strong lineup of eclectic indie artists but, pivotally, an additional interest in capturing the mainstream crowd. From Kanye West’s shining ego on Saturday to Madonna’s short-and-skanky dance tent appearance Sunday, the indie snob’s once-safe haven was taken over by squealing strangers – and two sold-out days later, it’s hard to tell whether Coachella will continue down the beaten pop path.

Whatever. For the most part, Coachella still retained its joyous communal atmosphere, a kaleidoscopic place where alternative art reigns and nobody knows your name. (And there are celebrities under every rock.) For me, it was The End: the final fling before graduation, the last irresponsible trip with my best friends. But it was also the beginning, as I discovered thanks to some artists, some new opportunities, and a chance meeting with my very own Yoda, though taller and with some ketchup in his beard.

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