Tag Archives: Eagles

Midnight Caller Episode 5

He was a spaz. So bad that he once slapped a teacher right across the face. We couldn’t believe it. The whole class froze for a moment. And then sped up very fast like an old film projector breaking loose from a jam. There was David, running around the room while we lost our minds, screaming like chimps until Mrs. Oatman caught him and threw him in the bathroom where he tore it up until he went quiet. Nervously, she opened the door to check on him and he was out like a shot and running down the street; running home again.

David was a year older than us but in the same grade. He had a frenetic energy that fueled kids and exhausted adults. He came by it naturally. His dad, Dave Sr., would scream from the sidelines of our baseball games. “Run, you pollack! Run!” We couldn’t believe he called him that, his own son. But the more we laughed, the more the veins in his neck bulged. “Run you pollack! Run!”

While Sr was screaming, Jr was whispering. It was a creepy habit he’d picked up that summer. He’d heard it on the radio and thought it was hilarious to come up behind you, quiet as a black cat, and whisper in your ear: “Be quiet, big boys don’t cry. Big boys don’t cry.” We were in 4th grade and despite our recently acquired trucker mouths, we were not big boys. The act of one of our classmates whispering that in our ears was unnerving and he knew it. That’s why he did it. He was a year older, after all.

It was also the summer of the Atlanta child murders and even though we were 1200 miles away, we were enthralled with horrified fascination. They were our age, some of them. And they kept disappearing. One after another. Sometimes found, sometimes not.

“He’s gonna get us,” Dave would cackle as we raced back to our houses when the street lights came on. “He’s gonna get us!”

It didn’t matter how many times we explained that Georgia was a 12 hour drive away and that he seemed to target black kids, Dave would talk about how he was going to get us. There were countless ways he was going to get us too. In our beds, in our garages, reaching up to pull us down just before we reached the top stair. He was there and he was going to get us. Dave talked about this non-stop. HE was in every conversation, every drawing, everywhere. Dave talked and talked and talked about him.

Until one day Dave disappeared, and we never saw him again.

Songs featured:

“One of These Nights” by Eagles

“Angelina” by Daystar

“I’m Not in Love” by 10 CC

Video: Worst Band Ever!

Video: Worst Band Ever!

A while ago on the GLONO message boards the topic came up of who was the worst rock band of all time. As things tend to do around music snobs, things quickly turned to disemboweling Baby Boomer favorites. GLONO’s Jeff Sabatini immediately recognized that this would make a perfect xtranormal video. Enjoy.

Classic Rot

Classic RockI listen to the signals

That the ancient strangers play

What are they doing here?

Something so familiar to my ear

“Classic Rot” —Dramarama

When Dramarama penned that song for their fourth album Vinyl, I thought for sure that they were making a statement about the state of radio—a swipe at their inability to muscle in to traditional rock stations that were too wrapped up in playing the classic rock tunes of twenty-years prior to consider a band like Dramarama. Ironically, Dramarama is a band so attuned to the rock styling of their ancestors that they should have found a nice home on any classic rock station.

But they weren’t, and that was a drag to me.

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Indie Chart Toppers

Ice Cube - PredatorLast week, when Vampire Weekend‘s sophomore effort was the top selling album in America, Billboard announced that Contra was “only the 12th independently distributed album to top the Billboard 200 chart since SoundScan began powering the list in May of 1991.” Curious what the other eleven were? Here they are:

1991 – N.W.A. – “EFIL4ZAGGIN” (Ruthless/Priority)

1992 – Ice Cube – “The Predator” (Priority)

1994 – “The Lion King” (Walt Disney)

1995 – “Friday” soundtrack (Priority)

1995 – “Pocahontas” (Walt Disney)

1995 – Bone Thugs-N-Harmony – “E. 1999 Eternal” (Priority)

1995 – Tha Dogg Pound – “Dogg Food” (Death Row/Priority)

1997 – Bone Thugs-N-Harmony – “The Art of War” (Priority)

2007 – Eagles – “Long Road Out of Eden” (self released/Wal-Mart)

2008 – Radiohead – “In Rainbows” (TBD/ATO/RED)

2009 – Pearl Jam – “Backspacer” (self released/Target)

2010 – Vampire Weekend – “Contra” (XL/ADA)

Not a lot of what you’d really think of as “indie,” is there? That’s because Billboard defines an independent album based on the title’s distribution:

If an album is sold by an indie distributor (or, one of the major label’s indie distribution arms), it is classified as an independent title and can chart on our Top Independent Albums tally. Classification is not based on a label’s ownership, or if an act is signed to an independent label.

In the mid-90s Priority Records was sold to EMI and Walt Disney Records switched to Universal Music Group Distribution, which led to a ten-year absence of indie releases at the top of the album chart until the Eagles came along and changed everything!

Eagles – Long Road Out Of Eden

Eagles - Long Road Out Of EdenEaglesLong Road Out Of Eden (Eagles Recording Company)

True story: I once received a Christmas present from a co-worker who knew I was a music fan. The album that he bought me was the Eagles Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975.

I was gracious; I thanked him for the gift and referred to the record’s huge appeal. Privately, I thought it was a little shortsighted. I mean, I was sure that I had let on about a few bands that I like and I am absolutely positive that the Eagles never once entered into the conversation. Perhaps this is the record that people turn to whenever they’re faced with addressing someone who is a bit of a music fan; because, fuck, so many people bought Greatest Hits that it must mean that everyone who likes music loves that album.

I left the gift in its shrink rap and traded in on something more aligned with my own musical taste.

Continue reading Eagles – Long Road Out Of Eden

Billboard Boosts Eagles, Bumps Britney

In a last-minute decision Bilboard magazine revised its chart policy to allow the Eagles to debut at #1 over Britney Spears’ new album. Without this change, the Eagles wouldn’t have charted at all because their album is only for sale at Wal-Mart.

In consultation with Nielsen SoundScan, Billboard will now allow exclusive album titles that are only available through one retailer to appear on The Billboard 200 and other charts, effective with this week’s charts. Prior to this, proprietary titles were not eligible to appear on most Billboard charts.

It’s notable that Eagles manager Irving Azoff had been vying for this change for the entire week leading up to the decision. “If the Eagles were SoundScanning this week, even though it’s only available at one retailer, Britney wouldn’t be No. 1,” Azoff told Billboard on Wednesday, October 31.

In explaining the change, senior analyst and director of charts Geoff Mayfield said, “We know that some retailers will be uncomfortable with this policy, but it was inevitable that Billboard‘s charts would ultimately widen the parameters to reflect changes that are unfolding in music distribution. We would have preferred to make this decision earlier, but only became aware within the last 24 hours that Wal-Mart would be willing to share the data for this title with Nielsen SoundScan.”

Continue reading Billboard Boosts Eagles, Bumps Britney

Albatross: The Eagles and the Power of Success

Take it to the limit one more timeChoreographer Twyla Tharp recommends in her book The Creative Habit that when reading an author who has more than one book, starting with the most recent one and then working backwards is the most effective as regards understanding just how that author’s thinking developed. That idea came to mind when reading the postscript to the recently published Da Capo Press edition of To the Limit: The Untold Story of the Eagles by Marc Eliot. The book originally appeared in 1998. This paperback edition includes some further observations from Eliot about, primarily, Don Henley. No, I didn’t start contemplating reading Eliot’s earlier works on Walt Disney, Bruce Springsteen, Phil Ochs, and Cary Grant. While a reasonably good writer, Eliot is prone to flights of metaphoric excess, with the excess loading the thing down such that the flight is bathetic. To wit: “For what had first made them so great was also what had always driven them so crazy, from their first downshift in the speed zone to the final gassy rev down memory lane. Inevitably, it seemed, no matter how fast they drove, they could never quite lose the reflection that tailed them in the rearview: the image of their own heated youth, already exhausted by their high-speed, chrome-dipped, supercharged, and eternally conflicted souls.” Sounds like Dante morphed by the writers of a Mazda commercial. Zoom-zoom.

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