Tag Archives: George Harrison

Timeline of the early Beatles solo era

George Harrison was the first Beatle to put out a solo project when he released his Wonderwall Music soundtrack on November 1, 1968. At that point, the Beatles were still together and had just wrapped up the recording of the White Album. They would spend the month of January 1969 filming and recording what eventually became Let It Be. By the end of August 1969 Abbey Road was in the can, and the next month John Lennon told the other Beatles, “The group’s over, I’m leaving.” They all kept quiet about it while they renegotiated their record contracts. But Paul McCartney told Life magazine in November 1969, “The Beatles thing is over. It has been exploded, partly by what we have done, and partly by other people. We are individuals, all different.” Nobody seems to have picked up on this at the time though.

It wasn’t until April 1970, when Paul released McCartney, that the world figured out that the Beatles had in fact broken up. By that time, though, there had already been six prior solo albums released and three singles.

When you look at the timeline from the release of Wonderwall Music through the end of 1970, it’s crazy how much stuff they put out.

November 1, 1968: Wonderwall Music (George)
November 11, 1968: Unfinished Music No. 1: Two Virgins (John)
November 22, 1968: The Beatles (White Album) (Beatles)
January 13, 1969: Yellow Submarine (Beatles)
April 11, 1969: “Get Back” (Beatles)
May 30, 1969: “The Ballad of John and Yoko” (Beatles)
May 9, 1969: Unfinished Music No. 2: Life with the Lions (John)
May 9, 1969: Electronic Sound (George)
July 4, 1969: “Give Peace a Chance” (John)
September 26, 1969: Abbey Road (Beatles)
October 6, 1969: “Something”/”Come Together” (Beatles)
October 20, 1969: Wedding Album (John)
October 20, 1969: “Cold Turkey” (John)
December 12, 1969: Live Peace in Toronto 1969 (John)
February 6, 1970: “Instant Karma!” (John)
February 26, 1970: Hey Jude album (Beatles)
March 6, 1970: “Let It Be” single (Beatles)
March 27, 1970: Sentimental Journey (Ringo)
April 17, 1970: McCartney (Paul)
May 8, 1970: Let It Be album (Beatles)
May 11, 1970: “The Long and Winding Road” (Beatles)
September 25, 1970: Beaucoups of Blues album (Ringo)
October 5, 1970: “Beaucoups of Blues” single (Ringo)
November 23, 1970: “My Sweet Lord” (George)
November 27, 1970: All Things Must Pass (George)
December 11, 1970: John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (John)
December 28, 1970: “Mother” (John)

* When UK and US release dates differ, the earlier of the two is displayed.

Image is a detail of the cover of Electronic Sound, painted by George Harrison.

All the Videos From CONAN’s George Harrison Week

If you’ve seen A Hard Day’s Night then you know George was definitely the coolest Beatle. If you’ve seen any clip of him you know it. And so it’s fitting that we celebrate George Harrison Week with Conan O’Brien and a cast of friends, family and admirers.

Beck Kicks it off with “Wah Wah” and the influence of All Things Must Pass on Beck’s sound become so obvious now.

Next is George’s old pal, Paul Simon with a tasty cover of “Here Comes the Sun.”

Contrast that with this version of the George Harrison and Paul Simon playing it together in 1976 and you can FEEL the years wash over you.

Continue reading All the Videos From CONAN’s George Harrison Week

George Harrison’s Apple Records Remastered, Re-released

The last few have been banner years for Beatles fans. The band’s catalog has been remastered in mono and stereo for digital and vinyl release, volume one of Mark Lewisohn’s meticulously researched trilogy was released, and both McCartney and Lennon back catalogs have also been getting the reissue/repackage/repackage treatment—replete with extra goodies. And now George is catching up.

George Harrison’s first six solo albums, released between 1968 and 1975 on The Beatles’ Apple Records label, have been digitally remastered from the original analogue masters for CD and digital release. The deluxe, eight-disc boxed edition, The Apple Years 1968-75 will be out on September 22. The albums included are:

  • Wonderwall Music
  • Electronic Sound
  • All Things Must Pass
  • Living In The Material World
  • Dark Horse
  • Extra Texture (Read All About It)

The entire set was supervised by George’s son, Dhani. Thank God for this kid, eh? His dedication to the old man’s legacy is really heart-warming.

Read all about the extra bits and ordering information on the George Harrison official release page, or just watch the teaser video.

All Things Must Pass on Vinyl, Hi-Res Download

All Things Must PassJust a couple weeks ago, we learned that Paul McCartney would be releasing his remastered Band on the Run album as a High Resolution (24bit 96kHz) download, and now George Harrison’s estate is doing the same thing with All Things Must Pass for its 40th anniversary on November 26. No word on whether you’ll be able to get versions with and without peak limiting like you can with Band on the Run, but the fact that hi-res audio is becoming de rigueur from the Apple/Abbey Road team is surely a good sign.

In addition to the digital download, All Things Must Pass will be also released on 180-gram vinyl in its original three-LP configuration, remastered at Abbey Road Studios from the original analog master tapes.

George Harrison: iTunes, Amazon, Insound, eMusic, wiki

Continue reading All Things Must Pass on Vinyl, Hi-Res Download

Lost Classic: Ron Wood – I’ve Got My Own Album to Do

Ron Wood - I've Got My Own Album to DoRon WoodI’ve Got My Own Album to Do (Warner Bros.)

God damn the early 70s must have been fun. We’ve all seen Almost Famous and the life of a somewhat known (fictional) band looked great, so imagine what it was like to be in the World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band! Well, in 1974 Woody had the best of all worlds when he started out as a member of The Faces with Rod Stewart and then jumped over to be a Rolling Stone when guitarist Mick Taylor left. In between he recorded a star studded solo affair that stands up as a case study what you can do when your best friends are rock stars.

Just look at the personnel listing according to Wikipedia:

* Ron Wood: vocals, guitar, percussion

* Keith Richards: guitar, vocals, percussion

* Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar

* Willie Weeks: bass

* Andy Newmark: drums

* Ian McLagan: organ, piano, synthesizer

* Sterling: steel drums

* Ross Henderson: steel drums

* Mick Taylor: bass, guitar, organ, synthesizer

* George Harrison: guitar, backing vocals; unconfirmed

* Jean Roussell: organ, piano

* Pete Sears: bass, celeste

* Micky Waller: drums

* Martin Quittenton: guitar

* Rod Stewart: backing vocals

* Ruby Turner: backing vocals

* Ireen & Doreen Chanter: backing vocals

Continue reading Lost Classic: Ron Wood – I’ve Got My Own Album to Do

Sloan – Parallel Play

Sloan - Parallel PlaySloanParallel Play (Yep Rock)

I took some heat a while ago for saying that Sloan‘s quest to sound like the Beatles was bordering on parody. Never Hear the End of It had some totally cool songs, but I still think that too many Fab elements leave you sounding more like the Rutles than the Beatles.

So, did the Canadians take my advice and dial back the Liverpudlian a bit? Not really, but for some reason it works this time. Maybe it’s that the songs are better, or maybe it’s because I am in deep into another of my frequent Beatle deep dives. I don’t know, but I like this album MUCH better than the last.

Album opener “Believe in Me” kicks off with some tasty guitar strums that are what Class A amps were made to create. Backed up with some Marc Bolan-like drums, “Believe” delivers three minutes and eighteen seconds of boogie and a healthy dose of snark. It’s the best opening track for Sloan since One Chord to Another’s “Good in Everyone” and that’s saying something!

Continue reading Sloan – Parallel Play

Traveling Wilburys Reissued

Traveling Wilburys Reborn With Rhino. Billboard: “After being out of print for more than a decade, the two studio albums from all-star band the Traveling Wilburys will return to the marketplace in a variety of formats June 12…”

Too bad they’re not releasing a remix that eradicates Jeff Lynne’s awful production…

Adieu

So now another is gone. George Harrison, the “Quiet Beatle.” Cancer. Horrible.

In some regards, Harrison was the Rodney Dangerfield of the group. Sure, Ringo seemed to be the one who could get little, if any respect. But the difference is that Harrison actually earned it. While I have previously argued that the Beatles are the premier example of a group that is better than the sum of its parts, that group without Harrison would have been a far paltrier outfit.

Rock and roll was once figured to be about youth and vitality. It was something with chronological limits: “I hope I die before I get old.”

Perhaps this is an argument based on my own increasing chronology, but I’d like to suggest that rock and roll is now about relevance. Otherwise we wouldn’t be so concerned about the failure of Jagger, the fatuousness of Sting, and pomposity of Aerosmith.

And we wouldn’t take a moment to reflect on the passing of a signal musician in the genre’s history.