Tag Archives: Journey

Shocker: Rock Hall inducts terrible bands

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced its 2017 class and–as usual–it’s disappointing. In a year when musical revolutionaries such as Bad Brains, Kraftwerk, Jane’s Addiction, and the MC5 were nominated, we somehow ended up with guilty pleasures Electric Light Orchestra, Journey, and Yes.

“Besides demonstrating unquestionable musical excellence and talent, inductees will have had a significant impact on the development, evolution and preservation of rock & roll.”

Sure, I suppose you could made drunken arguments that those three bands are worthy of respect. In fact, I’m pretty sure I have made those arguments myself after a few too many rum and cokes. But they suck. It’s cheese. It’s garbage. And even if those bands had an influence on other performers, the performers they influenced sucked even harder.

Of those three, ELO is obviously the least awful and Yes is the worst. And just like in real life, Journey is the mediocre one in the middle. I mean, come on. I enjoy Journey as much as the next guy who grew up in the arcade era. “Wheels in the Sky” is a badass jam and I can still close my eyes and picture Steve Perry’s pixelated head bouncing from drum to drum in the videogame. [It was actually the drummer’s head on that level, not Steve Perry. -ed.] But they’re fluff. Just because you have a song featured in a key scene in an “important” tv show doesn’t make you an important band.

Other performers inducted in this class were Joan Baez, Pearl Jam, and Tupac Shakur. Fine. Whatever. I don’t listen to any of that stuff, and in the case of Pearl Jam I don’t even like it, but I recognize the “musical excellence and talent” blah blah “impact” blah blah blah.

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Superchunk – In Beween Days

Video: Superchunk – “In Beween Days”

This is just as good as you’d imagine it would be. Everybody loves Superchunk; everybody loves this song; the whole is just as good as the sum of its parts. So glad this band is back together and doing new stuff.

That AV Club Undercover series is pretty cool. Clem Snide‘s Eef Barzelay covered Journey‘s “Faithfully” and it’s really touching.

Superchunk: iTunes, Amazon, Insound, wiki

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Steve Perry Really Loves Journey Fans

Journey Hollywood Walk of FameGQ‘s Alex Pappademas offers highlights of his two-hour, 11,000 word interview with the former lead singer of Journey. Foolish, Foolish Throat: A Q&A with Steve Perry:

I live just above San Diego, in Del Mar. And occasionally when I get up to Los Angeles, sometimes I’ll go out on the weekend, and some of these clubs, man—this new generation in the clubs, man, they’re playing this song, and when it comes on they’re screaming it out to each other. The girls are screaming “Just a small-town girl.” They’re screaming it at clubs. Do you have any idea what that feels like? In my lifetime, to see another generation embrace this? As I said in the beginning with you, there’s something reverent about that, to me. And I only wish to protect it, because it means something to them, like it means something to me. I don’t wanna see that get damaged. I really don’t. And I just love to see them love it so much. It just completely slays me. I would have never—I would have never thought that was gonna happen. I mean, who knew?

The whole, huge interview is pretty great. And Pappademas even follows up with Neal Schon. Definitely worth reading. If you need further proof that it’s a great interview, check out Perry’s story about spying on fans checking out Journey’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

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Journey vs. Irony, Nostalgia

In the flesh – Even without with Steve Perry, Johnny Loftus finds something inspirational in a recent Journey show: “It wasn’t nostalgia or worse, irony, that brought a sold-out crowd to its feet for the ballad ‘Open Arms.’ … It was as if the switch everyone has nowadays, that switch that turns off empathy, community, or even humanity in a rabid quest for self-preservation, suddenly shorted out. … It was blissful mayhem, and Journey—not nostalgia—made it happen.”