Tag Archives: Mick Jagger

Lost Classic: Ron Wood – I’ve Got My Own Album to Do

Ron Wood - I've Got My Own Album to DoRon WoodI’ve Got My Own Album to Do (Warner Bros.)

God damn the early 70s must have been fun. We’ve all seen Almost Famous and the life of a somewhat known (fictional) band looked great, so imagine what it was like to be in the World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band! Well, in 1974 Woody had the best of all worlds when he started out as a member of The Faces with Rod Stewart and then jumped over to be a Rolling Stone when guitarist Mick Taylor left. In between he recorded a star studded solo affair that stands up as a case study what you can do when your best friends are rock stars.

Just look at the personnel listing according to Wikipedia:

* Ron Wood: vocals, guitar, percussion

* Keith Richards: guitar, vocals, percussion

* Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar

* Willie Weeks: bass

* Andy Newmark: drums

* Ian McLagan: organ, piano, synthesizer

* Sterling: steel drums

* Ross Henderson: steel drums

* Mick Taylor: bass, guitar, organ, synthesizer

* George Harrison: guitar, backing vocals; unconfirmed

* Jean Roussell: organ, piano

* Pete Sears: bass, celeste

* Micky Waller: drums

* Martin Quittenton: guitar

* Rod Stewart: backing vocals

* Ruby Turner: backing vocals

* Ireen & Doreen Chanter: backing vocals

Continue reading Lost Classic: Ron Wood – I’ve Got My Own Album to Do

Death of a Junky: the Rolling Stones

Sympathy for the DevilDigging through the archives, we recently realized that we had lost track of one of the finest items posted to GLONO. Back in the day, this was the first post that we pulled aside and showcased as a feature, but it somehow got lost in the shuffle of redesigns and content management system switches. We’re happy to bring it back. —Jake

Death

of a Junky: The Rolling Stones

by

Derek Phillips

Drugs are evil. Make no mistake. Queen

of Darkness Marilyn Manson takes the stage in front of a huge 12-foot tall neon

sign that reads D-R-U-G-S. Drugs turn people crazy, especially the people trying

to outlaw them. Drugs are the evil Lord and the Stones worshipped at its altar

for 20 years and reaped the benefits before they fell from grace and lost their

souls to Billy Blanks.

"Sympathy for the Devil" may

be the most evil song in the world. The Stones forced anyone who dared to listen

beyond the jungle rhythms to face facts–you shit in your bed, now sleep in it.

Everything about that song is great. It is rock and roll. It is everything

parents were afraid of. I’ve seen clips of the recording sessions where Keith

couldn’t get up off the studio floor to listen to playbacks. They stood on the

precipice of depravity and spit over the edge.

The Stones were bar-none the Greatest

Rock Band in the World. They proved it time and again and were untouchable

throughout the seventies and even into the early eighties. Some Girls was

one of the best of their career, and though Tattoo You didn’t

reach the highs (and lows), of earlier records, it still had gems.

Then something happened.

Something wrong… Something ugly…

Something vile…

They got healthy.

Continue reading Death of a Junky: the Rolling Stones

Keef Dishes on Some of His Faves

Guitar World has a great little interview with Keith Richards discussing his favorite Stones’ songs and how they came about. There’s nothing surprising on the songlist itself, but some of Keith’s commentary on them is really interesting.

Selected gems include:

Satisfaction – When I wrote the song, I didn’t think of that particular riff as the big guitar riff…I actually thought of that guitar line as a horn riff. The way Otis Redding ended up doing it is probably closer to my original conception for the song….And two weeks later I hear it on the radio. I said, “No, that was just a demo!” They said, “No, it’s a hit.” At least Otis got it right. Our version was a demo for Otis.

Mother’s Little Helper – The main riff is a 12-string with a slide on it. It’s played slightly Orientalish. This was even before sitars were used in rock music. It just needed something to make it twang, ’cause otherwise the song was quite vaudeville in a way.

Jumping Jack Flash – “Jumping Jack Flash” comes from this guy, Jack Dyer, who was my gardener—an old English yokel. Mick and I were in my house down in the south of England…On the record, I played a Gibson Hummingbird [acoustic] tuned to either open E or open D with a capo. And then I added another [acoustic] guitar over the top, but tuned to Nashville tuning [tuned like a 12-string guitar without the lower octave strings]. I learned that from somebody in George Jones‘ band, in San Antonio in ’63. We happened to be playing the World Teen Fair together. This guy in a Stetson and cowboy boots showed me how to do it, with the different strings, to get that high ring. I was picking up tips.

Street Fighting Man – On “Street Fighting Man,” there’s one six-string and one five-string acoustic. They’re both in open tunings, but then there’s a lot of capo work. There are lots of layers of guitars on “Street Fighting Man,” so it’s difficult to say what you’re hearing on there. ‘Cause I tried eight different guitars, and which ones were used in the final version I couldn’t say.

Gimmie Shelter – Some guy crashed out at my pad for a couple of days, then suddenly split in a hurry and left that guitar behind, like, “take care of this for me.” I certainly did. At the very last note of the take, the whole neck fell off. You can hear it on the original track. That guitar had just that one little quality for that specific thing. In a way, it was quite poetic that it died at the end of the track.

Can’t You Hear Me Knocking – We thought we’d finished. We were just rambling and they kept the tape rolling. It was only when we heard the playback we realized: “Oh they kept it going. Okay, fade it out there… no wait, a little bit more, a bit more…” Basically, we realized we had two bits of music: there’s the song and there’s the jam.

Start Me Up – …on a break I just played that guitar riff, not even really thinking much about it; we did a take rocking away and then went back to work and did another 15 reggae takes. Five years later, Mick discovered that one rock take in the middle of the tape and realized how good it was. The fact that I missed “Start Me Up” for five years is one of my disappointments. It just went straight over my head. But you can’t catch everything.

Lots more in the full article.

The Rolling Stones: 1969 World Tour Photos

The Rolling Stones’ 1969 World Tour kicked off days after the death of Brian Jones and ended with the death of Meredith Hunter at Altamont, captured in the film Gimme Shelter. Who would have guessed that this tour would mark the death of the 60s?

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, 1969

Here, Mick and Keef take a break for some time in the sun. The image forms part a new exhibition dedicated to the tour photography of Ethan Russell, ‘Let It Bleed: The Rolling Stones’ 1969 US Tour’ and will be on display at London’s Proud Galleries, May 23 – July 20.

Via The NME.

McCartney Photos on Exhibit

Mick Jagger in New York, 1966

For photographers, access is everything and you don’t get much better access to rock royalty than being married to a Beatle.

Rolling Stone has a tasty online gallery of pics from Linda McCartney from an upcoming exhibition of her photographs to mark the 10th anniversary of her death.

According to the Telegraph, “[Sir Paul] McCartney spent the past three years putting together the show, handpicking and approving 30 images, many of them never seen in public, taken by his first wife, a professional photographer.”

Included in the collection is a self portrait of Linda McCartney taken just month before her death.

Mick Jagger – The Very Best Of Mick Jagger

Mick Jagger - The Very Best Of Mick JaggerMick JaggerThe Very Best of Mick Jagger (Rhino)

The idea of a best of Mick Jagger solo album is a bit laughable; out of the seventeen songs included on The Very Best of Mick Jagger, only four tracks actually made the top forty singles charts. Out of those, one of them featured another superstar (David Bowie) and a well-publicized cause (Live Aid) to help lift it into the top ten while two others (“Let’s Work” and “Lucky In Love”) barely cracked the top forty at all.

Now consider this with the notion that the idea of a Mick Jagger solo album actually started when tensions between Mick and Keith reached a point to where the Stones were considering a life apart.

Yes, there are tremendous holes throughout the solo albums that he recorded out of spite and those that he recorded out of a need to express what he couldn’t do with the Stones. All of this means that a compilation of highlights from Jagger’s solo releases is actually a pretty good idea and The Very Best of Mick Jagger is actually a pretty good record.

Continue reading Mick Jagger – The Very Best Of Mick Jagger

Ideal Happiness is Watching Mick Jagger

I find it hard to say much good about Mick Jagger these days. His abysmal solo album and corporate rock antics with the Stones make him the poster child for not aging well. So it’s rather refreshing to come across something he does that is redeeming. I found it in the most unlikely of places, the local art house movie theater.

The film is called The Man From Elysian Fields, and though it’s not perfect, it is undoubtedly Jagger’s finest cinematic performance. Yes, I know that’s not saying much if you only consider his acting roles (i.e. Freejack) but Jagger in this movie rivals even Mick as himself in Gimme Shelter.

Continue reading Ideal Happiness is Watching Mick Jagger

Mediocre Mick

So I actually listened to the songs that Mick’s Web site is streaming from his new album, Goddess in the Doorway:

“Visions of Paradise”—Perhaps if Eddie Money had recorded this song in 1988 I might have liked it.

“Joy”—Would someone please just kill Bono?

“God Gave Me Everything”—At least this song rocks a bit. Would’ve been a nice inclusion on Steel Wheels.

“Don’t Call Me Up”—Cloying, but I like it. I can still buy Mick as a crooner. Isn’t that what old irrelevant rock stars are supposed to do, anyway? This song is good stuff; the perfect rock cliche of unrequited love turned to hate, hate that’s ultimately betrayed by feelings still unresolved. I love the way Mick says “Argen-ti-nah”, the Bon Jovi-esque guitar solo near the end, and the wonderful strings that Axl Rose only wished he could pull off with such finesse.

“Goddess in the Doorway”—Good beat, in the right Detroit techno hands it could make a dance remix as good as the Stones’ “Dance”. Why those hands would soil themselves with this album in the first place is another question.

“Too Far Gone”—Could have been a really cool song if it wasn’t so overproduced. Why is there an organ and strings in what should have been a nice stripped-down alt.country track bemoaning our fast-paced society? (Yes, Mick, you and your boys screwed up when you went disco instead of continuing to chase Gram’s Cosmic American vibe.) I still like the song, hope someone with more talented producers with better ears will record it someday.

Who knows what’s lurking in the tracks I didn’t hear, but I doubt it’d be enough to make this anything other than a middling record from someone who’s long ago given up the ghost of respectability. Jann Wenner, were he capable of it, should be embarrassed. If Lester Bangs were alive today, I think he’d need quite a bit of Romilar to get through this whole album.

GOD GAVE HIM EVERYTHING HE WANTS

GOD GAVE HIM EVERYTHING HE WANTS

And Look! It’s All Here! On Display!

Johnny Loftus

After mainlining triptophan for 12 hours, it’s likely that the majority of Mick Jagger’s aging domestic fanbase were lying catatonic in their Barcoloungers by the start of “Being Mick,” ABC’s documentary of the legendarily rooster-like Rolling Stone. But even if those in Jagger’s near-septegenarian agegroup had skipped a fourth and fifth helping of green bean casserole to see the show, they may have been left scratching their heads. Because if “Being Mick” illustrated anything, it’s that Jagger’s new solo material is banking on a much younger demographic than his regular gig’s bombastic tours and schlocky studio work normally aims for. Filmed by documentarian Kevin MacDonald (One Day In September), “Being Mick” is a decidedly MTV-esque (think of that network’s “Diary” series, and you’re close) look inside Jagger’s bizarre world; a place populated by enormous homes, numerous children, plenty of jet-setting, and – of course – Lenny Kravitz.

The nice thing to see is that Jagger doesn’t seem to care what anyone thinks of him. He doesn’t apologize for his, er, “bohemian” approach to love and marriage; in fact, he jokes with one of his twentysomething daughters, promising her that he won’t date anyone younger than her. The documentary paints Mick as an aging, yet still vital English Gentleman who is as happy showing off his collection of 18th century oils as he is grooving in a studio with Wyclef Jean. Now, as it has been noted here at GloNo, this is TV, and it is sweeps week, and “Being Mick” is at its core an extremely expensive ad for his new record. But like it or not, Mick Jagger didn’t become impossibly, sickeningly rich and famous without a little bit of talent. And “Being Mick” does succeed at proving that the man is, in fact, an impossibly, sickeningly rich rock star who still has some talent. At first, the sequence chronicling Jagger’s visit to Jean’s studio to record the final track on Goddess In The Doorway seems oddly incongruous. As Clef and Mick do a faux electric slide side by side, Jean’s posse looks on with puzzled glances. Read: “Yeah, I know he’s Mick Jagger, but GODDAMN, that white boy’s old!!” But this is followed by a shot of said white boy laying down his vocals to a track playing in his headset. With his voice all we can hear, Jagger shimmies and shakes, flails wildly and smacks his lips, obviously enjoying the song and his vocal. It amounts to not only a testament to his still-strong voice; it also acts as a clinic for those burgeoning rockstars in short pants over at MTV who seem to use their “Diary” platform as an excuse to bitch and moan about how tough touring is. Jagger takes it in stride, finishes his vocal track, and before we know it is relaxing in the limo, chatting politely on a cell phone about his excitement over working with Jean. All in a day’s work for an aging Glimmer Twin.

In another vignette, Mick jets to Miami Beach for a session with Lenny Kravitz. Upon entering Lenny’s lair, one of Jagger’s pals describes the combination home/studio as a rock star’s 21st century vision of a 60s rocker’s intergalactic bachelor pad wetdream. Or something like that. Which would also describe Kravitz’ production of “God Gave Me Everything I Want,” a crunchy, double-tracked slice of rawk that, if it didn’t sound almost exactly like Lenny’s own new single, would be the perfect re-introduction of Jagger to a new generation. (Or maybe that’s exactly the point…). But that’s just good ol’ Lenny, continuing to one-hour martinize the greasy, analog work of his 60s and 70s AOR heroes.

Either way, when at the end of “Being Mick” the man of the hour takes the stage in LA for the song’s premier performance, his funky chicken in stride as he fronts a band of well-coifed young guns, Jagger tears into the aggressive vocal with mirth that suggests he’s still virile in more ways than one. Whatever you think of Mick’s opulent lifestyle, his past (or current) dalliances, or his charmingly detached austerity, at 58 he’s still a rocker. And in the end, perhaps that’s what being Mick Jagger is really all about.

JTL

Annoyance Alert

I’ve just witnessed an ad on ABC for a show that will be on at 10 pm Eastern Thanksgiving night: “Being Mick.”

Yep, him.

(See him mugging in the studio; see him in exotic places; see him with a toddler; see him just like a regular person who happens to be incredibly rich and consequently unlike any regular people that any of us know.)

Let’s see… Britney, JLo, Garth Brooks, and now Mick all in a matter of a few days on the tube, all around the “sweeps” that drive up costs that advertisers pay for commercial time—and drive up the costs that we all pay for products to accommodate that charge.

How can purveyors of rock and roll change your life? Well, one way is by lightening your wallet.