Tag Archives: Patti Smith

Listen to Frontier Justice 2/19/17

The Thousand Points Of Light Memorial Waterfall lies dry at the center of the Super 7 Mega Mall food court tetrahedron, and everybody’s got an opinion as to why. Hair triggers, we have them. In this new reality of hot takes and burning questions, it’s fun to clamber onto a roof and shout “BELL BOTTOMS” over and over into the night sky. Jon Spencer Blues Explosion strut their way outta “Frontier Justice” in its college radio days and into this new consciousness, the latest FJ delivery system being Spotify. And speaking of that new consciousness, on this set JSBX drops into the void between Danny Brown‘s stuttering, claustrophobic “Ain’t It Funny” on one side and Lady Gaga‘s “Diamond Heart” on the other. Young, wild Americans, both.

Spotify: Frontier Justice 2/19/17 (35 songs, 2 hr 3 min)

At the top of the set, Norway’s Sigrid makes her debut with “Don’t Kill My Vibe” and M.I.A. returns with the typically martial “P.O.W.A.” Minor Threat and Agent Orange remind us that the establishment was riling up the youth in the early moments of the Me Decade, Patti Smith remains royalty, and “Said It Already” is new, incisive and grooving from young Londoner Ama Lou. Elsewhere, Tommy Genesis oozes volatility and effortless after-hours club cool on “Art,” and Dai Burger wants to be your class president. Did you know Michelle Branch is back? Hopeless Romantic is her first full-length in 13 years; it was written and co-produced with Patrick Carney of the Black Keys, and sounds like it. Angel Olsen released one of 2016’s best records in My Woman — The engrossing, cinematic “Sister” is a highlight — and digging deep into the Spotify Sound Vaults reveals classic material in a new light: Elvis Presley brings both vulnerability and bluesy swing to an alternate take of “Heartbreak Hotel,” and The Supremes are full of funky soul on “Bad Weather,” the 1973 nugget produced and written by Stevie Wonder.

There’s some Ratt along the way, because after all, what goes around comes around (and they’ll tell you why), L.A. Witch is back with cool new stuff for Suicide Squeeze, RTJ remind us to stay hungry and pissed, and Eminem is no less than unhinged on “No Favors,” one of the many standouts on Big Sean‘s terrific new record I Decided.

Making playlists isn’t protest. It’s not political action. But it can be a soundtrack for both dancing and dissent, and do its best to uphold the art of discourse, which in these polarizing times is increasingly under attack. And if you want to completely check out, there’s always room on Goat‘s delightfully weird magic carpet. Here, “Try My Robe.”

JTL

You can also try an Apple Music playlist. Let me know if this works. -ed.

Continue reading Listen to Frontier Justice 2/19/17

Shoplifters Of The World Unite

I Was a Teenaged ShoplifterKids today. With their filesharing, anonymously hiding behind their campus IP address, stealing music in their fucking underwear. It’s embarrassing when you consider the art form that generations before them had to perfect just to get free music.

We called it shoplifting.

Don’t worry. I’m not about to steal your iPod at work or lift your Xanax prescription if you invite me over to your place. I’m not especially proud of my prior delinquency, but I understand that it is a part of me and my musical collective.

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Lester Bangs in Creem

FreedomWe all know that Lester Bangs got his start at Rolling Stone. Here at Glorious Noise, we’ve gathered up links to his Stone reviews that are available online twice: Lester Bangs in Rolling Stone (2006) and Even more Lester Bangs in Rolling Stone (2007).

Those are all great, of course, but Bangs really kicked his prose into high gear after Jann Wenner fired him from the Stone for being “disrespectful to musicians.” He moved to Detroit Rock City and took over Creem. Since today marks the 26th anniversary of his death, we’re honoring his memory by providing links to a bunch of his classic pieces for Creem

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Patti Smith – Smells Like Teen Spirit video

AOL’s Spinner blog has the video for Patti Smith’s cover of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” from her latest album, Twelve (review).

I like the banjo. Overall, a pretty successful cover. Creepy video, too. Watch it after the jump.

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Patti Smith – Twelve

Patti Smith - TwelvePatti SmithTwelve (Columbia)

This has been a good period for Patti Smith. At least vis-à-vis acknowledgment and recognition for her 30+-year career in public. She received an Order des Arts et des Lettres from the French culture ministry in ’05. This year she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Recognition from the French, laudable as it may be, surely didn’t do a heck of a lot for Jerry Lewis’s career. Chances are, the same could be said for Smith (i.e., you’re not likely to move music in France or elsewhere as a result). And as for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame—think about it this way: In order to get into Cooperstown, Akron, or other places called “hall of fame” it is generally necessary to be retired for some period of time. That doesn’t do a whole lot for one’s on-going career.

All of this notwithstanding, Smith is putting out music. Arguably (and measurably, charts-wise), Smith’s most successful song is “Because the Night,” which appears on Easter (1978). Some people, upon hearing it, may think that she’s covering Bruce Springsteen. That’s not the case. Smith and Springsteen co-wrote the song. His version appears on Live: 1975-85; he didn’t do it as a studio cut. Still, it sort of seems like it is his song, doesn’t it?

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Patti Smith – Gimme Shelter

Patti Smith – “Gimme Shelter” (Rolling Stones cover) from Twelve, due April 24 on Columbia.

Previously: Patti Smith at CBGB (and Other Music for Uplifting Gormandizers) and Patti Smith: A Beacon in the City of Lights.

Full P.R. babble after the jump…

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Hall of Shame: Stooges Kept Out

R.E.M., Van Halen, Patti Smith, the Ronettes, and Grandmaster Flash were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “Finalists who didn’t make the cut included Chic, the Dave Clark Five and the Stooges.”

Okay, people should be embarrassed that the Dave Clark Five were even finalists. Talk about also-rans. Jesus, if they’re going to induct every band that tried hard to sound exactly like the Beatles, the Hall of Fame is going to be even more meaningless than it is now. The Dave Clark Five? Come on!

And keep out the Stooges? Lame. Then again, look at all the inductees. Looks like they started scraping the bottom of the barrel around 2000…

Patti Smith at CBGB (and Other Music for Uplifting Gormandizers)

Jesus died for somebody's sins...but not Hilly'sPatti Smith at CBGB

Manhattan, October 15, 2006

I’ve been to CBGBs plenty of times. Hell, I’ve even played there three times. The place hasn’t been attracting big name bands for years, but since they lost their lease all the bands that cut their teeth at the club have been coming out in droves to show their love and respect for Hilly Krystal and the little club he opened 33 years ago.

Tickets for this last show sold out in 8 minutes on October 1, and I didn’t have one. I figured I’d stay home and listen to the live satellite radio broadcast and enjoy it that way, but this past week as the end came closer I thought I should go and attempt to bullshit my way into the show.

I got to CBGBs on Sunday at five o’clock pm and there were 30 people in line already. Doors were scheduled to open at 8. There were dozens of news trucks, camera crews and press in front of the club. Patti arrived around 6 and everyone broke into applause. I didn’t know she was so tiny. She came out a while later taking photos of the front of the club as the press swarmed around her and she answered their questions. It seemed everyone has a camera these days and wanted their picture taken in front of the club. I did it too.

Continue reading Patti Smith at CBGB (and Other Music for Uplifting Gormandizers)

Patti Smith: A Beacon in the City of Lights

Photography © Sue Rynski, 2005. All Rights Reserved. Used with permission.According to GloNo’s unofficial eye on the street in Paris and rock and roll photographer extraordinaire Sue Rynski (we use that adjective because (1) it sounds [and, well, essentially is] French and (2) Rynski hails from Detroit but now has her domicile [note our evident fluentness in a language we can’t speak]), while there were performances in eight cities around the globe with actors, musicians and others of a blovating nature holding forth on a subject upon which they have a tenuous grasp at best (i.e., poverty in Africa), there was an event of a different nature held in Paris: the seventh Solidays AIDS benefit. Rynski notes that the three-day event not only had music on three stages, but that in addition to the music, there were “villages” at the venue where people could learn about the subject that continues to be so devistating. Clearly, a novel concept in this age of “let’s pretend we really understand international finance before we move on to something else that catches our fancy.”

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