Tag Archives: Videos

New Willie Nelson video: Vote ‘Em Out

Video: Willie Nelson – “Vote ‘Em Out”

Willie Nelson - Vote 'Em Out

Single out now on Legacy.

Originally written during the 2018 midterms in support of Beto O’Rourke’s senate run against incumbent zodiac killer Ted Cruz, “Vote ‘Em Out” just got a brand new animated video for 2020.

So please, for the love of all that is holy, listen to Willie.

Willie Nelson: web, twitter, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

New Fuzz: Spit

Video: FUZZ – “Spit”

Directed by Charles Moothart. From III, out October 23 on In the Red.

Do you love the sound of loud guitars? Do you like rock and roll? Yeah? Then you should listen to this new song from Fuzz.

Fuzz is Ty Segall’s band with guitarist Charles Moothart and bassist Chad Ubovich. They recorded III on 2″ tape at legendary United Recordings Studio B with Steve Albini.

Moothart told Mix magazine, “Ty had done a mixing session at United Recording, so that is where the idea of recording at United with Steve came from. We wanted to record in LA to stay close to home; we wanted to be able to go in and get live takes and not stress too much on mixing, and we wanted it to be fun. All signs pointed to working with Steve at United.”

In a statement, Moothart said, “When Ty and I first started working on this song, we didn’t know if it was even going to be a FUZZ song or not. We wanted to make a song that felt straight forward, but had a subtle tweak that over time gets more obvious. The verse riff almost feels like you’re falling asleep at the wheel then the chorus opens up with a melodic, but sharp riff that adds to the punch-drunk feeling of the verse.”

Riffs, man. A badass riff might not be able to solve all the problems going on in the world, but it can definitely make you feel a little better for a few minutes.

Continue reading New Fuzz: Spit

New Laura Veirs: Another Space and Time

Video: Laura Veirs – “Another Space and Time”

Laura Veirs - Another Space and Time (Official Music Video)

Directed by Twixx Williams. From My Echo, out October 24 on Bella Union.

Sometimes you need a little bossa nova grooviness in your life. It might even help you imagine a world that wasn’t constantly awful. In her third single from the upcoming My Echo, Laura Veirs presents an alternate reality where “California’s not burning and the seas don’t rise.”

Veirs says, “This song is a dream that we can and will live in a more peaceful, loving world – and a world with more personal freedoms, too.”

Dare to dream!

Laura Veirs: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Laura Veirs: Another Space and Time

New Gorillaz video: Strange Timez (ft. Robert Smith)

Video: Gorillaz – “Strange Timez” (ft. Robert Smith)

Gorillaz - Strange Timez ft. Robert Smith (Episode Six)

Directed Jamie Hewlett. From Song Machine, Season One, due October 23 on WMG.

If you would’ve asked me twenty years ago if Robert Smith would still be around and making relevant music in 2020, I would’ve scoffed and said he should’ve retired after Disintegration. If you would’ve asked me the same thing about Damon Albarn, I would’ve replied, “The guy from Blur?”

That is to say: I’m an idiot. And please ignore any predictions I make about the future.

Because Robert Smith is still going at it and doing good stuff and the kids love the Cure more than ever, and the guy from Blur has turned his Gorillaz into a mainstream hit machine. Which boggles my mind, but what do I know? Clearly, not much.

(I am, however, still holding a grudge against Albarn for dropping Del the Funky Homosapien from the project after the first Gorillaz album. Del rules.)

So here we are in 2020 and Robert Smith has teamed up with the Gorillaz for a new Covid-themed single and he even appears in the video as the man in the moon. Which seems perfect.

Battle war of the worlds, surgical glove world, bleach thirsty world
I’m twitching in the grimy heat, I think I might be spinning

It is indeed a strange time to be alive.

Gorillaz: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

New Deep Sea Diver – Impossible Weight (ft. Sharon Van Etten)

Video: Deep Sea Diver – “Impossible Weight” (ft. Sharon Van Etten)

Deep Sea Diver - Impossible Weight featuring Sharon Van Etten (Official Video)

Directed by Jessica Dobson, Peter Mansen, Tyler Kalberg. From Impossible Weight, out October 16th on ATO.

I saw Deep Sea Diver open up for Wilco back in November, which was the last concert I went to before covid, unless I’m forgetting something, which I totally could be, because this fucking pandemic has obliterated any real sense of time or memory. I would’ve sworn that show was at least three years ago but nope.

And you can hear that maybe a little bit of the headliner rubbed off onto this new song with its swirling chimes and its verses that assassin down the avenue.

But that was then and this is now
I tried so hard not to let you all down
It’s an impossible weight
So I’ll just let you down now

When I was 14 I got into the Monkees when MTV started showing the reruns. Riding the success of that revival, Clive Davis of Arista Records convinced Micky and Peter to a record a few songs for a new hits compilation. “That Was Then, This Is Now” debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 on July 5, 1986, peaked at No. 20, and stayed on the chart for 14 weeks. I turned 15 during its reign and I loved it. The album, Then & Now…The Best of the Monkees, stayed on the Billboard 200 for 34 weeks. I played the cassette nonstop.

In not too long I would start to pick up the original albums at garage sales and the Rhino reissues at record stores. My copy of Headquarters had a crack (not a scratch, a crack) that went all the way through, but if I lined it up just right it would still play.

None of that really has anything to do with Deep Sea Diver, but if you’re going to have a chorus that says “that was then and this is now” then you’re going to get a Monkees story out of me and that’s just the way it is.

Oh and also: Sharon Van Etten rules.

Deep Sea Diver: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Deep Sea Diver – Impossible Weight (ft. Sharon Van Etten)

New Travis video: The Only Thing (ft. Susanna Hoffs)

Video: Travis – “The Only Thing” (ft. Susanna Hoffs)

Travis - The Only Thing (feat. Susanna Hoffs) (Official Video)

Directed by Fran Healy. From 10 Songs, due October 9 on BMG.

I bet you didn’t even realize how much you missed the sound of Fran Healy’s voice. Back in 2001, which--insanely enough--is almost twenty years ago, Johnny Loftus dubbed Travis the kings of “Nice Rock” and welcomed them and their fellow nice rockers Coldplay as an antidote to the Nu Metal clowns hogging the rock and roll airspace. Seems quaint now to even imagine rock and roll having any airspace to hog, but that’s a different story. Or is it?

At a time when the only guitars you’re going to find on the Hot 100 belong to Harry Styles and Taylor Swift, both of whom are perfectly fine and pleasant to listen to, maybe we’re overdue for a Nice Rock revival. Sure, it’s a long shot but wouldn’t it be…well, nice?

And maybe the chances of a breakthrough will be improved with addition of a voice that inspires even warmer feelings of nostalgia: that of tiniest Bangle, Susanna Hoffs, who has inspired everyone from Price to Matthew Sweet.

Aw, who am I foolin’? “The Only Thing” will pick up some plays on SiriusXM’s dadrock haven, The Spectrum (Ch. 28), or maybe Jenny Eliscu will find a place for it once or twice on XMU (Ch. 35). But the days are gone when the mainstream is going to embrace a pretty duet featuring pedal steel and clever lines like this:

You are the record in the record shop
Nobody wants to buy
You are the metaphor, the metaphor
The meta for the other guy.

That’s okay. So it goes. The niche of folks who care about music like this can stayed tuned to Glorious Noise and we’ll keep uncovering gems like this for you.

Travis: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Travis video: The Only Thing (ft. Susanna Hoffs)

New Sylvie Simmons video: The Thing They Don’t Tell You About Girls

Video: Sylvie Simmons – “The Thing They Don’t Tell You About Girls”

Sylvie Simmons: "The Thing They Don't Tell You About Girls"

Video by Ryan Sarnowski. From Blue on Blue, out now on Compass.

Sylvie Simmons is a writer for Mojo and author of the definitive biography of Leonard Cohen, I’m Your Man (Harper Collins, 2012) and recently helped Debbie Harry write her memoir, Face It (Dey Street, 2019). She also plays the ukulele and writes gentle little songs that might sneak up on you and break your heart.

A few years ago her song “Hard Act to Follow,” originally released on her self-title debut (Light in the Attic, 2014), was featured in a Nicky Hornby movie. Which makes sense. Another author who is obsessed with music…

She told Pop Matters, “You shouldn’t make an album if you’re a music journalist and don’t use ukulele to do it. I was expecting to be quite humiliated, and it was quite the opposite. It was an absolute wonder to me.”

Now Simmons has released her follow up, Blue On Blue. Once again produced by Howe Gelb, the recording sessions were interrupted by a debilitating accident that ultimately required her to alter her ukulele style. “There were songs that took a lot more movement of my hand than I was able to do. But they’ll be on the next album.”

Simmons describes her new single as “a sad song that came out sounding happy. Songs do that sometimes; they have no respect for the people that write them.”

Sounds like the song turned out just the way it was supposed to!

Sylvie Simmons: web, twitter, bandcampamazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Sylvie Simmons video: The Thing They Don’t Tell You About Girls

New Sufjan Stevens: Video Game

Video: Sufjan Stevens – “Video Game”

Sufjan Stevens - Video Game [Official Video - feat. Jalaiah]

Directed by Nicole Ginelli. Starring Jalaiah Harmon. From The Ascension, due September 25 on Asthmatic Kitty.

Soofy doesn’t wanna play your video game. That’s a metaphor, of course, but I can’t really picture him getting down with some Mario Kart either. I dunno. Maybe he does, but I can’t see it.

Either way, he’s not out there posting selfies and guesting on America’s Got Talent.

Stevens said, “It’s unfortunate that we live in a society where the value of people is quantified by likes, followers, listeners and views. So many people are seeking attention for the wrong reasons. I think we should all be doing our best work without looking for accolades or seeking reward.”

Is Sufjan the last person in America who cares about selling out?

He continues, “The main takeaway of ‘Video Game’ for me is: your worth (invaluable) should never be based on other people’s approval (ephemeral). Just be yourself. Keep it real. Keep it moving. Do all things with absolute purity, love and joy. And always do your best.”

I suppose if he wanted to sell out, he’d crank out another 50 States album. He’s already done Michigan, Illinois, and Oregon, so: Three down, 47 to go! Get on it! Do your best!

Sufjan Stevens: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Sufjan Stevens: Video Game

New Neil Young: Lookin’ For A Leader 2020

Video: Neil Young – “Lookin’ For A Leader 2020”

Neil Young - Lookin' For A Leader 2020 (Official Music Video)

From The Times EP, due September 18 on Reprise.

A new version of a song originally released during the George W. Bush administration, Neil updates the lyrics for today.

We got our election
But corruption has a chance
We got to have a big win
To regain confidence
America is beautiful
But she has an ugly side
We’re lookin’ for a leader
In this country far and wide

Good old Neil. We know he recently sued the Trump campaign for using his music at his rallies and now he’s calling him out in song.

Just like his big new fence
This president’s going down
America’s moving forward
You can feel it in every town
Scared of his own shadow
Buildin’ walls around our house
He’s hiding in his bunker
Something else to lie about

We’ve given Neil crap over the years for dashing out lyrics without putting much craftsmanship into the effort but sometimes the directness works. This is one of those times.

We don’t need a leader
Building walls around our house
Who don’t know black lives matter
And it’s time to vote him out

Yes it is. Make sure you’re registered. And make sure you cast your ballot. And if you don’t trust the USPS, you can drop off your ballot in person. Find out where. Your place probably has a secure dropbox where you don’t even need to get within six feet of anybody. Do it!

Neil Young: web, twitter, bandcamp, amazon, apple, spotify, wiki.

Continue reading New Neil Young: Lookin’ For A Leader 2020

Why Dolly Parton Matters More Than Most You Can Name

Back in the 1960s there was a war going on. A physical war. One with guns and bullets. With American kids being shipped literally to the other side of the world and plopped into jungles where the terrain was in itself rotten, to say nothing of the fact that there were other kids shooting at them. Some of those kids had volunteered to service. Others were selected by lottery, sort of like Theseus and the Minotaur—or The Hunger Games.

And in the 1960s and early ‘70s there were protests in the streets of America by other kids who wanted the war in Vietnam to be ended. They didn’t want their friends to be killed. They didn’t want themselves to be killed. Of course politicians—Johnson and Nixon—did what politicians tend to do, which is to worry more about themselves than others. They rolled out a rationalization that were Vietnam to fall, then it would be the first of a series of dominoes. The North Vietnamese were “communists.” That would mean there would be a whole bunch of commies created as a consequence.

On April 30, 1975, there was the fall of Saigon. The Americans left. The North won.

And now everything from clothes to hair extensions, from computers to shoes, are being produced in Vietnam and shipped to places around the world. Including the U.S.

Now the government is against production in China. Vietnam has become a more acceptable source.

Funny how times change. Countries and people.

During the 1960s and early ‘70s music was changing, as well. A simple way to think about this is that there was AM radio on the one hand and the nascent-but-growing FM band on the other.

AM radio played 45-rpm records. They were capable of handling approximately 3 minutes of music, so that’s why there were so many short songs. FM radio played cuts from LPs, which at 33.3 rpm, were capable of handling approximately 20 minutes per side. So the AM stations played the “hits” while the FM stations—at least those that were considered to be “underground”—would play entire sides of albums at a time. Very subversive, that.

Musicians that had their music played on FM, musicians who were chronicled in the pages of publications like Rolling Stone when it was literally a tabloid on newsprint with gritty coverage, were often openly anti-war. Which was a tricky situation for them to be in back then, because on the one hand they were trying to gain traction in what was still an AM-hits-driven market and on the other, as righteous as that position may seem, at the time there was a majority of Americans who didn’t have that point of view. Yet “The Man” wasn’t going to keep them down, so there were festivals and concerts where the peace sign (as in the pointer and middle fingers forming a V, which Winston Churchill had used about 25 years before to signify “victory”) and the circular graphic version (which was actually created in 1958 by a designer Gerald Holtom, who came up with it as a nuclear disarmament symbol: one interpretation is that it is based on the semaphore communication system that uses flags; the sign for “N” has two flags down at a 45-degree angle and the “D” is one flag straight up and the other straight down) proliferated everywhere.

Jimi Hendrix didn’t play “The Star Spangled Banner” at Woodstock just because he thought it would be a clever cover.

All of this is to get to something that is highly laudable that happened this past week, when Billboard published a cover story on Dolly Parton, the 74-year old country singer, songwriter, actress, and apparently all-around good person.

Perhaps the most widely reported quote from the interview is “Of course Black lives matter. Do we think our little white asses are the only ones that matter? No. Everybody matters.”

She also said, “All these good Christian people that are supposed to be such good Christian people, the last thing we’re supposed to do is to judge one another. God is the judge, not us. I just try to be myself. I try to let everybody else be themselves.”

And with those two quotes she has arguably said more than I’ve heard from any number of musicians, and those who are speaking out seem to be more interested in doing it in some metaphoric ways than Parton’s clear, unambiguous statements.

She had named a dinner attraction named “The Dixie Stampede.” She dropped the “Dixie”—in 2018.

“There’s such a thing as innocent ignorance, and so many of us are guilty of that,” Parton told Billboard. “When they said ‘Dixie’ was an offensive word, I thought, ‘Well, I don’t want to offend anybody. This is a business. We’ll just call it The Stampede.'”

Woke well before others.

Continue reading Why Dolly Parton Matters More Than Most You Can Name