Tag Archives: Remastered

George Harrison’s Apple Records Remastered, Re-released

The last few have been banner years for Beatles fans. The band’s catalog has been remastered in mono and stereo for digital and vinyl release, volume one of Mark Lewisohn’s meticulously researched trilogy was released, and both McCartney and Lennon back catalogs have also been getting the reissue/repackage/repackage treatment—replete with extra goodies. And now George is catching up.

George Harrison’s first six solo albums, released between 1968 and 1975 on The Beatles’ Apple Records label, have been digitally remastered from the original analogue masters for CD and digital release. The deluxe, eight-disc boxed edition, The Apple Years 1968-75 will be out on September 22. The albums included are:

  • Wonderwall Music
  • Electronic Sound
  • All Things Must Pass
  • Living In The Material World
  • Dark Horse
  • Extra Texture (Read All About It)

The entire set was supervised by George’s son, Dhani. Thank God for this kid, eh? His dedication to the old man’s legacy is really heart-warming.

Read all about the extra bits and ordering information on the George Harrison official release page, or just watch the teaser video.

George Harrison - The Apple Years 1968-75 Box set - Released 22nd September

Sound + Vision Interviews Beatles Remastering Team

Maybe you’re sick of talking about The Beatles‘ remastered catalog, but we’re not. Especially when it comes to the technical inside baseball talk and getting insight to some of the decisions made by the remastering team.

Sound + Vision caught up with project coordinator Allan Rouse and recording engineers Guy Massey and Paul Hicks. Most of the interview hits the usual audio geek questions around gear and the condition of the original tapes, but this bit caught my eye:

…we wanted to improve the recordings at least to an extent that helps them sound better, perhaps, for the 21st century. I suppose you could argue that you should remaster them twice: once for the people from the ’60s, and again for the new generation.

Please don’t tell me there’s ever been any consideration to enter The Beatles into the loudness wars. I don’t like the sound of remastering “for the new generation” since those poor kids have been bombarded with noise with no rest in the dynamic range for more than a decade. Massey attempts to clear it up:

We were obviously aware of the Loudness Wars — squashing, brickwalling, all that sort of stuff — and we didn’t want to do that. We wanted to retain the original dynamics. So for the loudest part of the loudest songs, there may be limiting of 3 to 4 dB, but for most of the songs, most of the time, there isn’t any limiting.

But then Rouse chimes in with some nonsense about The Beatles not just being about the sound, but the songs. Well, no shit. But the sound of those recordings is almost as important as the songs they capture. The Beatles revolutionized popular music recording and the dynamic range of the music is part of that revolution. They specifically moved the kick drum mic closer to Ringo’s kit to capture a particular sound that was essential to backbeat music.

As happy as I am with the remastered catalog, talk like that makes me nervous about any future work.

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